Advanced forms of TER

Prerequisite Reading: Portuguese verb TER. Superpowers? Sim, TER has superpowers. Though these are considered advanced-level, any ambitious learner can start using them now! Just keep in mind that the conjugation of TER is very irregular. Let’s start with the most used: The Imperative of Ter You will hear these all_the_time: Tenha um bom dia! >…

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Portuguese verb TER

Portuguese verb TER is among the top 10 most important verbs. It’s conjugation is very irregular. The very first sentence I used in Brazil was, Você tem o jornal de hoje?. I asked it at a newsstand! I came off pretty nervous sounding. But it was a successful first try. I managed to pronounce the…

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Portuguese Expressions of Time

These are really useful ways to talk about the timing of things. These are the most common ones but, you can also modify these to say exactly what you want to say without learning anything else! I put most of these on my flashcard stack and memorized them before traveling to Brazil. Test yourself: Study…

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pequeno & grande – menor & maior

Stumbling block #1 for new learners is making sense of how Brazilians say small, smaller, smallest & big, bigger, biggest. What’s the big deal? In all Portuguese you express things like short, smart, fat, fast, sexy like this: short = baixo shorter = mais baixo shortest = o mais baixo * And of course, the…

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The Use of POR in Portuguese

I got really curious about the use of por in Portuguese. Google Translates por as a long list of words: by, for, per, in, of, to, with, via, out of, for the sake of ETC. Confusing to say the very least. While true that por can translate as all of the above, I’ve found that…

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Modern Brazilian introductions

You can score BIG points just being able to meet & greet in Brazil. Before you even know how to say anything else, learn these. Use them to practice your pronunciatiion – you’ll be using them over and over. For example — Tudo bem is the main thing everyone says when seeing someone you know…

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to need in Portuguese

You need to learn Portuguese because you have to visit Brazil before you die. Just as in English, there are two ways to express need. Each has its own specific way of being used. (1) precisar PRECISAR = to need. Precisar is a little tricky because you must always put a “de” after it unless…

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Conectivos e conectores: Aditivas

Words that connect us. In this first of a series of posts we are going to talk about those words & phrases that are always there — holding the sentence together. Tudo bem? In grammar-speak, these are called conjunctions. Do not be afraid. They are your friends. You already use them all-the-time 😉 Aditivas: Indicam…

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Vamos embora!

Vamos emobra! When Brazilian’s say goodbye. IN ORDER OF USAGE (most common first) — the ways Brazilians say good-bye. (1) Tchau! (2) eu vou embora EMBORA = away. Eu vou embora. = I’m going away (leaving). Most dictionaries list this as: em•bo•ra | {conj.} (apesar de; ainda que; ainda) That’s because this is an expression…

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Você sabe onde fica? – in Portuguese.

Have you decided what will be the first real sentence you try to speak? “Bom dia” and “Tudo bem” don’t count. Something useful. Something that will help you on your travels in Brazil and start a simple conversation. For me it was this: Você sabe onde fica…? Perfect, right? >> “Where is whatever (located)?” This…

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mais in Portuguese

Mais (more) finds it’s way into many expressions, always assuming the role of saying most or, more. Let’s look at one of the most useful ways mais in Portuguese can say things like: prettier, heavier, younger and etc. (ie, as an adjective). Examples of mais to express most can be found in this other post….

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Portuguese preposition de

The Portuguese preposition de shows up in many different places. As you know — I HATE to dig into grammar-speak unless it’s really necessary to move you into Portuguese fluency. So, I won’t. But, let me just say that it’s worth being said that a preposition is a word that ties others together. Each language…

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tudo vs. todo

Todo mundo: everyone gets confused over these two common words. Actually, they’re called indefinite pronouns. Officially, their job is to “represent either count nouns or noncount nouns”. What?! These are just the words that convey: all, every, entire etc. The confusion stems from the fact that tudo sounds a lot like todo. To keep them…

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