the Imperfect Indicative

In Portuguese, there are several ways to refer to something that happened in the past, each with varying shades of meaning. Verb tenses! The Past Imperfect – officially called the Imperfect Indicative (o Pretérito Imperfeito), is used when talking about continuous or ongoing action in the past. Something that used to occur or, would occur. You’ll…

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por acaso & de propósito

por acaso » by chance Simônimos » inesperadamente, acidentalmente, casualmente, aleatoriamente, arbitrariamente Exemplo: Encontrei meus primos no festival por acaso. Não tínhamos combinado nada. » I met my cousins at the festival by chance. We hadn’t arranged anything. de propósito » on purpose Simônimos » deliberadamente, intencionalmente Exemplo: O propósito da vida é seguir a…

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The Portuguese JEITO

What is the Portuguese JEITO? It’s just an expression: JEITO = way, as in: let’s find a way. It’s somewhat notorious because Brazil has been known as the place where anything is possible. This comes mostly from the recent past in which one could for example, buy their way into a green card, bribe someone…

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qualquer in Portuguese

Now is a very good time to study Portuguese at home 😉 Take advantage of this time – it’s going to be over soon, believe it, or not. 30% off all memberships during the first phase of the pandemic. I’m old enough to remember the lan house. And in Brazil – especially the favelas you…

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Acabar vs. Acabar de

We’ve written about ACABAR de before — because it’s such a useful combination. When you place a de after acabar, it takes on the meaning of, to have just. ACABAR by itself means to end, to end-up, to finish. I’ve noticed that so many of you are getting these two forms mixed-up (confundida). A few…

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The Imperfect Subjunctive

Using the Imperfect Subjunctive In general, The subjunctive tense is used when the action you’re talking about has a degree of uncertainty. The Imperfect Subjunctive is used for actions that are very unlikely to happen, or to have happened. It’s sometimes called, the Past Subjunctive – that’s because it often talks about things that were unlikely…

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Other tenses of TER

Ter in the Future Tense The common way is to use the verb ir as a helper verb (the future tense with ir) Eu vou ter mais tempo amanhã. > I’m going to have more time tomorrow. Ele vai ter que correr. > He’s going to have to run. Você vai ter uma namorada nova….

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Advanced forms of TER

Prerequisite Reading: Portuguese verb TER. Superpowers? Sim, TER has superpowers. Though these are considered advanced-level, any ambitious learner can start using them now! Just keep in mind that the conjugation of TER is very irregular. Let’s start with the most used: The Imperative of Ter You will hear these all_the_time: Tenha um bom dia! >…

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Portuguese verb TER

Portuguese verb TER is among the top 10 most important verbs. It’s conjugation is very irregular. The very first sentence I used in Brazil was, Você tem o jornal de hoje?. I asked it at a newsstand! I came off pretty nervous sounding. But it was a successful first try. I managed to pronounce the…

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Muito or Muita?

Even I struggle to get this straight. The thing that makes this tricky: In Portuguese, we’re constantly reminding you to get your gender straight. And I’m not talking about your sexual preference here não! It’s a constant struggle to keep word gender correct, certo? Muito or Muita? Minha cerveja está gelada. Meu vinho está gelado….

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