the Preterit Indicative of irregular verbs

The Preterit Indicative (often called the “simple past”) is by-far, the most important past-tense to know. Let’s look at the most common irregular verbs in this tense: fazer, ter, ir, ser, estar, querer & dizer. There are many more irregulars, but most of them will follow similar patterns to these common examples presented here.

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COMEÇAR a / PARAR de

What’s so special about the verbs PARAR & COMEÇAR? For starters you’ve probably noticed that you always have to treat these verbs a little differently. For example, you can’t say “I stopped eating sugar” like this: eu parei comer açucar (NÃO!) — you need to include a de like this: Eu parei de comer açucar….

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Mesmo in Portuguese

One of the first things you’ll notice in Brazil is the word “mesmo.” You’ll hear it everywhwre! It has a few common uses: as “really” to emphasize, as “even though” triggering the subjunctive, and as “the same”. This post will show how to use ” mesmo”, and when it needs to become “mesmA” 😉

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Muito or Muita?

Is it Muito or Muita? In Portuguese, when talking about degree or intensity, always use “muito.” It’s the DEFAULT. For quantities you have to match the the subject. Below, I’ll help you decide when the situation is talking about degree/intensity, or quantity. When it’s not clear, ask yourself: is this about the quantity of something?

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Brazilian Gringos (parte 1)

“Gringo” is not a bad word in Brazil. It’s used as a kind label for any foreigner. DO NOT be offended when someone calls you a gringo! In these next two dialogs we’ll learn some very useful new vocabulário. Whenever you’re getting new vocab in a story with rich context, it’s supremely memorable!

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Mastering the Phrase ‘Um ao Outro’ in Portuguese (10 examples)

The phrase “Um ao Outro” in Portuguese can be translated as “each other” or “one another.” In this post you’ll see exactly how it’s commonly used, and how to deal with different genders and variations. “Um ao Outro” is crucial for expressing reciprocal actions or relationships in Portuguese, allowing for more accurate and natural communication.”

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Tomar in Portuguese

The Portuguese verb “tomar” can be confusing because it encompasses the meanings of “to take,” “to drink,” and “to consume.” Similar to “beber,” Brazilians specifically use “tomar” when something becomes part of their being or changes them internally. For instance, they “take” breakfast and coffee, but not lunch or dinner. Let me explain…

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mais in Portuguese

Let’s take a look at the different uses of ‘mais’ in Portuguese. It can compare one thing to another or simply mean ‘most’ or ‘more.’ You can use it to describe objects, or you can talk about the quantity of something, but using it correctly can be a challenge. As usual, in-context examples quickly bring this important word into focus.

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Dar para – the Portuguese power combo

The combination of the Portuguese verb DAR + para is one of the most powerful you will find. Let me show you how to convey possibilities and abilities. With lots of real-world examples, from making a meal to to asking if something is doable. It’s a unique construction that, along with other special verbs like FICAR, IR, and TER, accelerates language learning and aids in natural conversations.

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Pode ser

Pode ser is one of those phrases that finds it’s way into just about every Brazilian conversation. “Pode ser” in Portuguese, can express “maybe,” “could be,” or “possible,” and using it correctly will put you in charge of the conversation.

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The future with IR

In Portuguese, the fastest way to start talking about the future is with the verb IR. All you need to know is how to conjugate IR in it’s present tense. This will give you superpowers to construct useful sentences like “I’m going to swim later today,” “She’s going to be mad!,” and “We’re going to buy the nuclear powered scooter.” Embrace the potential of IR – combine it with ANY VERB and say what’s GOING to happen.

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The Portuguese Imperative

The Portuguese Imperative can be confusing! Brazilians simply do not use the imperative in a consistent way! There is however, a method to the madness. Let me explain. The conjugation of the imperative (used when giving a command) is the same as the present tense WHEN using the informal “tu” form. In other words…

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I can hardly wait.

There are 3 ways that Brazilians use to say that something hard to wait for. The most common is with “mal posso esperar” – “badly able to wait” (literally). We usually say “I can hardly wait” and Brazilians say, “Eu mal posso esperar”.

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Portuguese verb DAR – 7 ways to use it

The Portuguese verb DAR is a shape-shifter. When combined with other wordfs it can take on meanings like: working out, able to, worth it, can & cannot. We’ll dive into its multifaceted meanings, from giving luck to taking charge. Explore 7 uniquely useful ways DAR adds life and detail to what you want to say.

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tudo vs. todo

TUDO in Portuguese is used when talking about non-specific things. So for example when you say “tudo bem” you’re saying, “everything’s fine / all is well”. Use TODO & TODA when you want to get more specific about things. For example, when saying something like, “I like to see here every day before going to work”…

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