Quem é? & Qual é?

It’s often really confusing to understand how Brazilians say who and which. Quem é? Who is it? That’s what you say before opening the door or when a stranger calls on the telephone. Simple. But what about the other ways they use who? Let’s look at some very common examples. É de quem? Who’s it…

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Não dá. Eu odeio!

Eduardo Não dá, não dá! Não entendo nada! Nem física, nem literatura e nem gramática. Eu odeio química! Química! Por que que eu preciso aprender isso? Ana Calma filho. Sei que não é fácil. Você tem que ter calmo e estudar muito. Não dá. This is a great way to start a sentence. Literally no…

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Tô chegando in Portuguese

We’ve always had an specific vocabulary stack that we use just for setting up and managing our time. Since when has scheduling our lives not been top priority? Nunca. In Portuguese it’s no different. They have a core of really common verbs & vocab that they use again and again. But there are a few…

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qualquer in Portuguese

I’m old enough to remember the lan house. And in Brazil – especially the favelas you can still (it’s 2016) find them. In my early days traveling in Brazil I would always go to the same lan house. I would always go when I knew there would be this one girl working there – but…

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Tomar in Portuguese

The Portuguese verb TOMAR can be confusing. The problems comes from the fact that it can take the meaning of to take or to drink or to consume. In general, Brazilians use tomar when talking about taking something that will become part of their being – that will change them internally. What?! They won’t use…

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Deixa pra lá – in Portuguese

I’ve written about pode deixar before but everyone keeps asking about the ever-popular deixa pra lá. Why? Because deixar is just super-useful. It means of course, to leave, let. And when you use it as deixa pra lá you’re saying: deixa pra lá = nevermind, forget it, let it go. Like I said: VERY USEFUL….

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Portuguese Reflexive Verbs

Wikipedia defines reflexive verbs like this: A reflexive verb is, loosely, a verb whose direct object is the same as its subject, for example, “I wash myself”. More generally, a reflexive verb has the same semantic agent and patient (typically represented syntactically by the subject and the direct object). For example, the English verb to…

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English words used in Brazil

This post is making me extremely hungry. Here’s the deal: once you know these you don’t have to bother to learn the Portuguese equivalents. No need to. They are already in use in the common vocabulary here. Just be sure to say these words with your best brazilian accent. We’ve gotten a native to record…

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Ficar

I’ve posted about FICAR before – FICAR for intermediates and about SER & FICAR and Saying FICAR de Olho. FICAR is a big deal. It’s one of the few verbs that can really up your game. Italians have a big problem with this verb because apparently it means to fuck in italian. That’s their problem,…

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Portuguese prepositions & verbs

The Portuguese Gerund [check]; The Present Indicative [check]; The Subjunctive Mood [almost]; Portuguese Prepositions [check!] You’re on a roll. Portuguese prepositions? No big deal. Then, you run into an everyday sentence like, Eu vou parar de fumar. Sem problema, right? I am going to stop of to smoke. Seems wrong. If you know your gerund…

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Qualquer dúvida estou à disposição.

If you’ve ever heard this and wondered what it really means, PARABÉNS – your Portuguese is pretty advanced. Let’s break this expression down. You will hear it in business situations, or whenever someone is trying to help you out. Qualquer dúvida estou à disposição basically means, Feel free to ask any questions or, I’m available…

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Como você anda? (ANDAR in Portuguese)

Probably one of the most common phrases in Brazilian Portuguese, it means, ‘How have you been?’ But how does this work? ANDAR in Portuguese is one of those verbs that can simplify the language. We all know that Como você está? or, Como você vai? are the proper ways to ask how are you? — CORRETO….

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Getting mad in Portuguese

Do Brazilians lose their cool? Sure they do. They mostly try to maintain an I’m so relaxed appearance, that often gives way to the I don’t give a damn look. But when they lose it, things can turn ugly quickly. Let’s look at the most common ways Brazilians talk about anger. I’m not going to…

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Hurry up in Portuguese

You’ve heard it said: Brazil is a slow-paced world. Everything happens according to some tropical rológio (clock). And that’s true – mais ou menos. But being in a hurry, still happens here. There is always more to do than there is time to do it. Even in Brasil. How to say hurry up in Portuguese…

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Where’s the at in Portuguese?

I was enjoying a long hike in the nearby mountains – en route to some waterfalls. My girlfriend was with me and was pretty annoyed to see that I was not listening to her tell some story about getting arrested on New Year’s eve here. I just couldn’t stop thinking about prepositions of place. O…

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Vem cá!

I was practicing with the Pimsleur Portuguese’s audio program and had just learned about the imperative mood. That’s the tense (mood) you use when giving a command — or really any time that an exclamation point would be involved. Then I landed in Rio. Almost right away I could here people saying, vem cá. A…

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CONSEGUIR in Portuguese

Are you getting sick of my posts that just deal with a verb? It’s not for lack of other subjects, it’s just that the VERB IS KEY to building sentences and, fluency. Verbs are also handled very differently in Portuguese. We use phrasal-verbs extensively: get-over, get-going, get-ahead, get-away and on, and on, and on. It’s…

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PARECER in Portuguese

How would you say something like, You seem to be doing great or, You look tired -? How about, looking good or, seems like a good option -? I remember always getting stuck when trying to express – to seem, to appear. Then I discovered two things: 1- You don’t have be so literal when…

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