a partir de

There are several verbs that when used in specific ways open the door to new possibilities. Let’s look at the combination, A partir de and how this one can be used. The Portuguese verb PARTIR means: to leave, depart, go away. a partir de When combined like this, partir takes on the meaning: starting from…

Read more...

Saying: to run into, to bump into

Why is this so hard to say? to run into, to bump into: Saying it in Portuguese. When you’re in Brazil it’s normal to spend much more time on foot, walking the streets. Even though automobiles inundate life as here, the infrastructure of most cities just can’t handle them and as a result, there are…

Read more...

Chegou a hora – in Portuguese

Chegou a hora – in Portuguese means of course: the time has arrived, the time has come, or simply, it’s time. Seems so simple, right. But how would you say something like: “when the time comes to…” or, “please, be on time –? Simple Use: It’s time to work. > Chegou a hora de trabalhar….

Read more...

Portuguese ~or verbs

Is there no end to the suffering? It’s not enough that we have to learn to conjugate 3 different verb types (the ar, ei & ir endings). There is yet another group: the Portuguese ~or verbs! Sim, e não. The good news is, there are only a few of these actually used and: their conjugations…

Read more...

Dia Internacional do Samba

We all have our own unsolved mysteries about SAMBA, right? Do you really have to go to a samba school to learn samba? Is there some store where you buy those outfits? Can men samba too? Does it mean you’re gay if you do? It’s just like salsa – but with less clothing? It just…

Read more...

Bêbado

There’s this perception that Brazilians enjoy a drink. Verdade ou mito? VERDADE. It’s the weather. Imagine if all the skanky bars in your town were open air, tables spilling out onto the sidewalk where you could instantly see smiling people with cold drinks. I bet you’d stop by at least once in a while. That’s…

Read more...

melhor and melhorar

Most verbs have various related incarnations as nouns, adjectives, adverbs etc. MELHOR and MELHORAR are super-used words/verbs but also causes big confusion – I think just because these are (1) hard to pronounce, and (2) have so many similar sounding variations. Melhor and melhorar can be used in different ways to express: improve, improvement, improving,…

Read more...

Portuguese verb DAR – 7 ways to use it

We’ve gotten several requests to explain and show how the portuguese verb dar can be used. This is one of those verbs like ficar or, pegar that can change their meaning depending on the context. I remember feeling “deceived” and a bit mad when it dawned on me that people were using verbs that I…

Read more...

Não dá. Eu odeio!

Eduardo Não dá, não dá! Não entendo nada! Nem física, nem literatura e nem gramática. Eu odeio química! Química! Por que que eu preciso aprender isso? Ana Calma filho. Sei que não é fácil. Você tem que ter calmo e estudar muito. Não dá. This is a great way to start a sentence. Literally no…

Read more...

Qualquer dúvida estou à disposição.

If you’ve ever heard this and wondered what it really means, PARABÉNS – your Portuguese is pretty advanced. Let’s break this expression down. You will hear it in business situations, or whenever someone is trying to help you out. Qualquer dúvida estou à disposição basically means, Feel free to ask any questions or, I’m available…

Read more...

Como você anda? (ANDAR in Portuguese)

Probably one of the most common phrases in Brazilian Portuguese, it means, ‘How have you been?’ But how does this work? ANDAR in Portuguese is one of those verbs that can simplify the language. We all know that Como você está? or, Como você vai? are the proper ways to ask how are you? — CORRETO….

Read more...

SE FERRAR in Portuguese

Two people asked about this expression (it’s just a verb) this week so I think it’s time to do a post and explain. Se ferrar (a reflexive verb) translates to: to spike, to savage, to brand (with a hot iron), to bite (savagely!!!) ETC. It’s always some bad, bad situation: SE FERRAR And it’s usually…

Read more...

Sem Noção: Moto Lotada

This clip caught my attention. It’s a soft news piece. Except for the intro it’s spoken clearly and not too fast. The vocabulary is really core also. Once you get past the intro it’s perfect for training your ear (intermediate-advanced level). We use a lot of video (quase 100%) in our course, but we generally…

Read more...

TV entregue por moto

Here is another soft-news clip from a Rio de Janeiro channel. Once you get past the intro it’s great for training your ear (intermediate-advanced level). Learning Portuguese by watching video is a the most efficient way to study. We use a lot of video (quase 100%) in our course, but we avoid anything that ‘s…

Read more...

Faxineira sem noção

We use a lot of video (quase 100%) in our course, but we avoid anything that ‘s from a TV or the movies. The vast majority are just too fast and full of irrelevant vocabulary. If you do want to try a Brazilian movie, make sure you watch like this. But this clip caught my…

Read more...

Upon: ao

You’re already using “ao” to say at the or, to the, but it has another entirely different meaning when used together with a verb in the infinitive. When I first started hearing people say this I didn’t even notice t since it’s just an “ow” before of a verb. I though it was some weird slang….

Read more...