Tô chegando in Portuguese

We all have a specific vocabulary stack for setting up and managing our time. Scheduling our lives is a top priority, right? In Portuguese, it’s no different. They have a core of really common verbs & vocab that they use again and again. But there are a few tricks to staying within the standards. Encontros…

Read more...

Portuguese prepositions & verbs

The Portuguese Gerund [check]; The Present Indicative [check]; The Subjunctive Mood [almost]; Portuguese Prepositions [check!] You’re on a roll. Portuguese prepositions? No big deal. Then, you run into an everyday sentence like, Eu vou parar de fumar. Sem problema, right? I am going to stop of to smoke. Seems wrong. If you know your gerund…

Read more...

Getting mad in Portuguese

Do Brazilians lose their cool? Sure they do. They mostly try to maintain an I’m so relaxed appearance, that often gives way to the I don’t give a damn look. But when they lose it, things can turn ugly quickly. Let’s look at the most common ways Brazilians talk about anger. I’m not going to…

Read more...

Deu mole!

Moleza! Deu Mole! If you’re starting to have real conversations with real Brazilians, DEU MOLE! is one of the first girias (slangs) that you will hear. To understand this one let’s look at where it comes from. Maria Mole. *Some people just want to know what this means, but I love to know the origins….

Read more...

Portuguese verb HAVER

The Portuguese verb HAVER causes a lot of confusion. If you look at the definition it’s: haver = to be/to have (exist) But listening in on its actual use, you’ll find that it’s used just like the verb, TER. And then there’s the fact that it appears to be yet another verb to express TO…

Read more...

Cadê in Portuguese

Is this really Portuguese? Sim, é. You will hear it every day in Brazil. And for some reason, it’s not presented in any of the Brazilian Portuguese grammar books or other learning materials! Probably because it’s relatively recently become part of the common (conversational) vernacular. But it’s omnipresent.In conversational Portuguese, Brazilians will use CADÊ in…

Read more...

O que que você fez?

Que-que-que-que-que… That’s the sound of Brazilian Portuguese. Just as we have the word it and that in almost all of our sentences, so Portuguese has que. And sometimes it sounds as if that’s all they’re saying: que que que. Brazilians have the habit of swallowing the words on either side of the que. But the…

Read more...

Já in Portuguese

zzZZahhh is how it’s pronounced. Brazilians love to use this adverb. You will hear it all_the_time. That’s because there are many different ways they use it. Já in Portuguese can mean many different things. Let’s look at the most common. The first thing you need to know, is that it always keeps the core meaning…

Read more...

Os Gringos (parte 1)

“Gringo” is not a bad word in Brazil. It’s used as a kind word for any foreigner. DO NOT be offended when someone calls you a gringo. In this and the following dialog we will learn some very useful new vocabulário. The context is unforgettable and as a result you_will remember these words after watching…

Read more...

Num Corpo Só

You already know that learning a Portuguese song helps your language learning. But, did you know that it in-fact, super-charges you? It does. Images & music sets your brain in a highly stimulated state — and that makes it record what is happening in a uniquely powerful way. Here is a fantastic song by Maria…

Read more...

I can hardly wait.

This always gave me a real hard time. In English it seems so simple to simply say for example, I can’t wait to see you or, I can hardly wait for you to fall down and break your head. I’m not quite sure what category of grammar this falls into but it’s basically part if…

Read more...

Saying MOST in Portuguese

Saying most in Portuguese isn’t that obvious. The confusion comes from the fact that in English, we use most to talk about two different things: – NUMBER: Most of time it’s rainy. – DEGREE: I like rainy weather the most. In Portuguese these are expressed in different ways, depending on the context. When talking about…

Read more...

POR and PARA in Portuguese

The por and para question always seems to put everyone in a bad mood. And that’s because it’s one of those conceptual grammar rules that depends on the situation, and doesn’t make much sense. Why are there two words (actually, prepositions) to say essentially the same thing? And, what exactly does POR in Portuguese really…

Read more...

Physical descriptions in Portuguese

It seemed so strange to me to first hear people being referred to as: the white guy, that fat girl, the tall one. Maybe we’re too socially correct in the US or just more sensitive (cautious?) — but we don’t casually call people by their physical attributes, especially if it’s potentially unflattering or offensive. But…

Read more...

Chega in Portuguese

Some verbs have very different meanings in the context of specific situations. Here we see a Brazilian favorite: CHEGA! – in action. ~Enjoy. FELIPE O que você achou? CLAUDIA Oi? * Brazilians use “oi” to say “what”. FELIPE Do filme. O que você achou? JOSH Você viu essa ator no outro filme? CLAUDIA Oi? FELIPE…

Read more...

Você viu?

From the video learning course, INTENSIVO. To ask “did you see…” or, “have you seen…” use VER (to see). Like this: Have you seen Gabriela? > Você viu Gabriela? Did you see the game? > Você viu o jogo? What did you see there? > O que você viu lá? Have you already seen everything?…

Read more...