FUI in Portuguese

IR has to be one of the FUNNEST (most fun) verbs to conjugate into the preterite tense (the “simple past” – action that is over and done). SAY IT: eu fui, você foi. FUI in Portuguese, FOI in Portuguese – these are of course just ways to say I went, you/he/she went. It’s the past…

Read more...

Já in Portuguese

zzZZahhh is how it’s pronounced. Brazilians love to use this adverb. You will hear it all_the_time. That’s because there are many different ways they use it. Já in Portuguese can mean many different things. Let’s look at the most common. The first thing you need to know, is that it always keeps the core meaning…

Read more...

Os Gringos (parte 1)

“Gringo” is not a bad word in Brazil. It’s used as a kind word for any foreigner. DO NOT be offended when someone calls you a gringo. In this and the following dialog we will learn some very useful new vocabulário. The context is unforgettable and as a result you_will remember these words after watching…

Read more...

Num Corpo Só

You already know that learning a Portuguese song helps your language learning. But, did you know that it in-fact, super-charges you? It does. Images & music set your brain in a highly stimulated state — and that makes it record what is happening in a uniquely powerful way. Here is a fantastic song by Maria…

Read more...

I can hardly wait.

This always gave me a real hard time. In English it seems so simple to simply say for example, I can’t wait to see you or, I can hardly wait for you to fall down and break your head. I’m not quite sure what category of grammar this falls into but it’s basically part if…

Read more...

Saying MOST in Portuguese

Saying most in Portuguese isn’t that obvious. The confusion comes from the fact that in English, we use most to talk about two different things: – NUMBER: Most of time it’s rainy. – DEGREE: I like rainy weather the most. In Portuguese these are expressed in different ways, depending on the context. When talking about…

Read more...

POR and PARA in Portuguese

The por and para question always seems to put everyone in a bad mood. And that’s because it’s one of those conceptual grammar rules that depends on situation, and doesn’t make much sense. Why are there two words (actually, prepositions) to say essentially the same thing? And, what exactly does POR in Portuguese really mean?…

Read more...

Physical descriptions in Portuguese

It seemed so strange to me to first hear people being referred to as: the white guy, that fat girl, the tall one. Maybe we’re too socially correct in the US or just more sensitive (cautious?) — but we don’t casually call people by their physical attributes, especially if it’s potentially unflattering or offensive. But…

Read more...

Chega in Portuguese

Some verbs have very different meanings in the context of specific situations. Here we see a Brazilian favorite: CHEGA! – in action. ~Enjoy. FELIPE O que você achou? CLAUDIA Oi? * Brazilians use “oi” to say “what”. FELIPE Do filme. O que você achou? JOSH Você viu essa ator no outro filme? CLAUDIA Oi? FELIPE…

Read more...

Você viu?

From the video learning course, INTENSIVO. To ask “did you see…” or, “have you seen…” use VER (to see). Like this: Have you seen Gabriela? > Você viu Gabriela? Did you see the game? > Você viu o jogo? What did you see there? > O que você viu lá? Have you already seen everything?…

Read more...

Countries and Nationalities in Portuguese

I always struggled with the pronunciation of these. Made me feel pretty ignorant. Brazilians automatically expect foreigners to magically know how to say these (reasons unknown!). Countries and Nationalities in Portuguese: spoken by a native! From the video learning course, INTENSIVO.

Read more...

Somewhere, anywhere, nowhere in Portuguese

As a beginner you can use expressions like, não tem, and nada to express nothingness. But to say somewhere, anywhere, nowhere in Portuguese properly, it takes a little practice. These are not very obvious. How would you say for example, Let’s eat somewhere; Sit anywhere you like; or, She has nowhere to go -? Somewhere…

Read more...

Portuguese verb FICAR

The Portuguese verb ficar is the #2 verb in the language. (IR is #1) It has many different meanings. Let’s look at FICAR in several of the most common contexts: From the video learning course, INTENSIVO. Example 1: Sabe onde fica? This is the classic. This is the one phrase you absolutely must memorize before…

Read more...

Shopping in Brazil: Eu levo

You’ve just entered a clothing store in Brazil. Most likely, one of the sales clerks on the floor will immediately rush over to meet you. It will usually be someone your opposite sex. The clerk will try to be your instant friend and ask you where you are from and try to say whatever english…

Read more...

Qual filme é?

The last place on earth you’ll find a video rental store is in Brazil. Here, they still thrive yet no one actually knows why. Perhaps it’s because they are such great places to hook-up. You only need to ask the question: Qual filme é? From the video learning course, INTENSIVO. CLAUDIA Aqui tem algum filme…

Read more...

Portuguese Adverbs of Intensity

Some Portuguese adverbs are made for adding INTENSITY (emphasis). They have their own name too: adverbs of intensity. You don’t need to actually know what an “adverb of intensity” is – you already use them every day. You just need to know the vocabulary for expressing things like, ‘hardly’, ‘almost’, ‘completely’ as in, ‘I kind…

Read more...

de vez em quando

Once in a while. Portuguese does a lot with the word vez. It’s important to get up-to-speed on the way vez is used. Almost none of it is intuitive – you need to memorize these. Think about how English uses time and once to say different things: The time of my life. Once upon a…

Read more...

Você está atualizado?

ATUALIZAR is a really great verb that you can use to say things like, I need to update my software. > Eu preciso atualizar omeusoftware. and the past participle, atualizado (a): Is your CV (resumé) up-to-date? > O seu currículo está atualizado? and in the form of an adjective, atual: He’s bought the most up-to-date…

Read more...

Assigned seating in Portuguese

In English when we are talking about seating in an airplane, or a theater we just use the word seat. But when you want to talk about assigned seating in Portuguese, there is a special word that you need to use: o assento. Whenever it’s a reserved seat situation it’s called um assento. Where’s my…

Read more...